Twitter no longer allowing users to share photos, videos of another person without permission

Twitter will no longer allow users to share images or videos of private individuals without that person's consent, the company announced Tuesday. 

The policy expands on the social media company’s existing policy banning users from sharing a person’s private information such as a phone number or address. 

The ban won't pertain to sharing videos or images of public figures. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Twitter said that it also acknowledges that videos or images of private individuals may be shared “as part of a newsworthy event or to further public discourse on issues or events of public interest.”

In those cases, Twitter said “we may allow the media to remain on the platform,” but the company did not detail in Tuesday’s blog post how those decisions will be made.

In a series of tweets, the company said the policy update is intended to help curb the misuse of media to harass, intimidate and reveal the identities of private individuals “which disproportionately impacts women, activists, dissidents, and members of minority communities.”

Under the new policy, if a person reports having their private image shared by a user, that user will be required to remove the content and have their account temporarily locked until it is.

ADVERTISEMENT

The platform further clarified that images or videos that show people participating in public events, such as large scale protests or sporting events, would “generally not violate this policy.” 

Twitter also said it will “take into consideration” whether the image is publicly available or is being covered by journalists. 

Twitter said it will accept reports of violations of the new policy on sharing private media from the individual depicted in the reported media or from an authorized representative, such as a parent or legal guardian, or legal representative. 

The privacy policy update comes one day after Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey said he would be stepping down as CEO of the platform. He will be replaced by former chief technology officer Parag Agrawal. 

--Updated at 2:58 p.m.