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Amazon bans most sales of 'Mein Kampf' after decades of lobbying from Jewish groups

Amazon bans most sales of 'Mein Kampf' after decades of lobbying from Jewish groups
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Amazon has reportedly banned the sale of most editions of Adolf Hitler’s "Mein Kampf" after decades of lobbying from Jewish groups and Holocaust charities.

The tech company informed booksellers in recent days that they would not be permitted to sell a selection of Nazi-authored books within the online store, including Hitler’s autobiography and children’s books that were written to spread anti-Semitic ideas, The Guardian reported Monday

In an email obtained by The Guardian directed to those selling second-hand copies of "Mein Kampf," Amazon said “they can no longer offer this book” because it breaks its code of conduct. 

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Several Kindle eBook editions of the Nazi leader's memoir have been removed from the store, as well as his author page. Some foreign language academic editions of Hitler’s work were still available in Amazon’s U.K. bookstore.

Other books that were banned included "The Poisonous Mushroom" and "The Mongrel," both written by Third Reich publisher Julius Streicher, who was later executed for crimes against humanity for managing a Nazi newspaper. 

Holocaust charities have pushed for the book’s removal from Amazon since the late 1990s, The Guardian reported, while the company, which was originally a bookstore, usually pointed to free speech and education as reasons to keep selling it. But Amazon has recently has recently — and quietly — removed other Nazi-themed books and memorabilia, The New York Times reported in February.

The Hill has reached out for more details to Amazon, which did not comment to The Guardian directly on the "Mein Kampf" ban.

“As a bookseller, we provide customers with access to a variety of viewpoints, including titles that serve an important educational role in understanding and preventing antisemitism,” a spokesperson told the news outlet. “All retailers make decisions about what selection they choose to offer and we do not take selection decisions lightly.”