Trump tasks Pruitt, Chao to negotiate emissions standard with California: report

Trump tasks Pruitt, Chao to negotiate emissions standard with California: report
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAverage tax refunds down double-digits, IRS data shows White House warns Maduro as Venezuela orders partial closure of border with Colombia Trump administration directs 1,000 more troops to Mexican border MORE has reportedly tapped Transportation Secretary Elaine ChaoElaine Lan ChaoTrump nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rosenstein at DOJ Taiwan’s President Tsai should be invited to address Congress White House announces reduced delegation to travel to Davos amid shutdown MORE and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) head Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittEPA knows this pesticide is dangerous, so why did it reverse the ban? Archives investigation finds no ‘secret' Pruitt calendars existed California has sued the Trump administration 46 times. Here are the lawsuits MORE to negotiate fuel economy standards with California.

Trump instructed his administration to sit down with California, which has maintained authority to set its own emissions rules, in order to explore achieving a single fuel economy standard for the nation, The Associated Press reports.

Such a move would prevent two different standards that would require car makers to make two models of cars.

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Automakers met with Trump on Friday to discuss a draft proposal that would reportedly keep fuel efficiency requirements at 2020 levels for the next five years.

The EPA’s draft proposal would require that a fleet of new cars average about 30 miles per gallon and the standards wouldn't change until 2025, according to the AP.

The automakers at Friday's meeting reportedly said they do not necessarily support freezing requirements but want flexibility with the standards.

Californian agreed to the standards set under the Obama administration, which would have would have risen fuel efficiency standards to 36 miles per gallon by 2025.

According to the AP, if California splits from the federal standards being considered by the Trump administration, 12 other states — or 40 percent of all new-vehicle sales —  would follow California’s standards.