Trump poised to sign bipartisan water infrastructure bill

Trump poised to sign bipartisan water infrastructure bill
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpFacebook releases audit on conservative bias claims Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' Recessions happen when presidents overlook key problems MORE is poised to sign a bipartisan water infrastructure bill after it passed the Senate 99-1 this week. 

America’s Water Infrastructure Act, the most comprehensive infrastructure legislation passed this Congress, will authorize over $6 billion in federal spending on ports, harbors and waterways.

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It will also deauthorize spending on water projects that have been deemed inefficient.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeMcConnell, allies lean into Twitter, media 'war' Conservatives buck Trump over worries of 'socialist' drug pricing Criminal justice reform should extend to student financial aid MORE (R-Utah) cast the only "no" vote on the bill.

“President Trump called on Congress to take action on the country’s water infrastructure and we have done that today,” Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoIf Democrats want gun control, they must first concede defeat Conway: Republican concerns about gun reform 'all reconcilable' Five proposals Congress is eyeing after mass shootings MORE (R-Wyo.) said in a statement on Wednesday.

The bill authorizes billions of dollars for an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fund that provides money to improve drinking water infrastructure at the state level. It also extends a federal program aimed at improving the drinking water in Flint, Mich.

“This legislation invests in the critical water infrastructure we don’t see every day, but that American families in every state rely on, such as drinking water systems, dams, reservoirs, levees, and ports," Environment and Public Works Committee ranking member Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperAmerica is in desperate need of infrastructure investment: Senate highway bill a step in the right direction FARA should apply to Confucius Institutes The 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal MORE (D-Del.) said in a statement. "When it comes to local infrastructure projects, it ensures the voices of our country’s local governments are being heard by the federal government to ensure needs are being met and taxpayer dollars are being used efficiently.”

The legislation further addresses the water needs of marginalized communities by requiring each regional EPA office to tap at least one employee as the point person for minority, tribal and low-income communities.

It also includes a provision that requires the government to prioritize low-income communities for lead testing programs. 

The chairman of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator McConnell ups pressure on White House to get a budget deal Senators introduce bill to prevent border agency from selling personal data MORE (R-N.D.), released a statement lauding the act for its provisions seeking to enhance water infrastructure in tribal communities.

He pointed out that the legislation authorizes funding for water projects on tribal land and directs the secretary of the Army to investigate whether Native American tribes have been displaced by the construction of certain dams in Oregon.

The act also includes billions of dollars in de-authorizations toward the aim of being "fiscally responsible."

The bill authorizes funds but does not appropriate them.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPelosi, Schumer press for gun screenings as Trump inches away The malware election: Returning to paper ballots only way to prevent hacking First House Republican backs bill banning assault weapons MORE (R-Ky.) tweeted on Wednesday that America’s Water Infrastructure Act is "a major step toward meeting the challenge of improving our nation’s infrastructure."

"From dams, levees, and flood control to safer drinking water and sewage systems, this legislation meets all sorts of pressing needs," he wrote.