Senate panel to hold hearing on airline safety after Boeing crashes

Senate panel to hold hearing on airline safety after Boeing crashes
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Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzMichael Bennet declared cancer-free, paving way for possible 2020 run Booker, Harris have missed most Senate votes O'Rourke sweeps through Virginia looking to energize campaign MORE (R-Texas), chairman of the Subcommittee on Aviation and Space, announced a hearing on airline safety in the wake of the deadly crashes of two Boeing 737 Max aircrafts.

The hearing, “The State of Airline Safety: Federal Oversight of Commercial Aviation,” will take place on March 27.

National Transportation Safety Board chairman Robert Sumwalt, Transportation Department Inspector General Calvin Scovel and Federal Aviation Administration acting administrator Daniel Elwell are listed as witnesses.

No one from Boeing has been included as a witness

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President TrumpDonald John TrumpThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Obama condemns attacks in Sri Lanka as 'an attack on humanity' Schiff rips Conway's 'display of alternative facts' on Russian election interference MORE nominated former Delta Air Lines executive Steve Dickson to lead the FAA on Tuesday.

Rep. Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazioCongress: Pass legislation that invests in America's water future Not-So-Fat Cats: Over 25 million lower income workers will be paying the Wall Street Tax Airports push lawmakers to raise passenger fees MORE (D-Ore.), the chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and Rep. Rick LarsenRichard (Rick) Ray LarsenBooker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements Senate panel to hold hearing on airline safety after Boeing crashes FAA comes under new scrutiny over Boeing decision MORE (D-Wash.), the chairman of the subcommittee on Aviation, have also been in touch with Scovel, the Transportation Department Inspector General.

They sent him a letter on Tuesday requesting an investigation into the FAA’s certification of the Boeing 737 MAX.

Cruz has been one of the loudest critics of Boeing since the Ethiopian Airlines crash this month that killed 157 people, following a Lion Air crash in October that left 189 people dead.

He called for the grounding of the aircraft before Trump made the call on Wednesday.