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GOP lawmaker: We're past point of doing separate infrastructure bill

GOP lawmaker: We're past point of doing separate infrastructure bill
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Rep. Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisMcCarthy supports Cheney remaining in leadership amid calls for her to step down More than half of House GOP commits to vote for resolution calling for Cheney to step down from leadership GOP divided over Liz Cheney's future MORE (R-Ill.) said on Thursday that separate legislation addressing infrastructure in the House will likely not be passed in the near future, citing a lack of leadership on the issue.

“We’re already past the point of doing a separate infrastructure bill,” Davis, who is the ranking member on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Highway and Transit, told The Hill Editor-in-Chief Bob CusackRobert (Bob) CusackThe Hill's Morning Report - President Biden, Vice President Harris begin work today Incoming lawmakers stress coronavirus relief, economy as first priority of new session Rep.-elect Issa says Trump should attend Biden inauguration MORE.

The remarks were made at The Hill’s Future of Mobility Summit, which was sponsored by Qualcomm, Uber, the Edison Electric Institute, and the National Parking Association.

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“If folks were serious about that at the leadership levels, and the White House levels, that would have had to be done by August,” he continued.

President TrumpDonald TrumpMcCarthy says he told Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene he disagreed with her impeachment articles against Biden Biden, Trudeau agree to meet next month Trump planned to oust acting AG to overturn Georgia election results: report MORE faced major opposition by members of his own party earlier this year when he expressed support for a $2 trillion deal on the matter with Democrats.

Republicans called the deal too ambitious and said they are against any deal that adds to the deficit.

Davis did express optimism about the surface transportation reauthorization measure, which would aid highways, but warned that impeachment could suck the air out of any movement on the issue.

“So as we move into the surface transportation debate, I hope it doesn’t get sidetracked, but history shows us that impeachment will suck the energy and the air out of everything out here in Washington,” he said. “I hope we can sit down and really begin the process of putting the details together of a surface transportation reauthorization.”

Washington was taken by storm this week after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDivide and conquer or unite and prosper Trump impeachment article being sent to Senate Monday Roe is not enough: Why Black women want an end to the Hyde Amendment MORE (D-Calif.) launched a formal impeachment inquiry into Trump amid a whistleblower complaint alleging Trump applied political pressure to Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMcCarthy says he told Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene he disagreed with her impeachment articles against Biden Biden, Trudeau agree to meet next month Fauci infuriated by threats to family MORE and his son Hunter Biden.