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UK moves up deadline to ban sales of new gasoline and diesel vehicles

UK moves up deadline to ban sales of new gasoline and diesel vehicles
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The United Kingdom will end the domestic sale of gas- and diesel-powered automobiles by 2030, 10 years before the country previously planned to do so, the British government said Wednesday.

In a plan released by Prime Minister Boris Johnson's office styled as a 10-point plan for a "Green Industrial Revolution," the government pledged to "end the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans, 10 years earlier than planned," in the year 2030.

"We are taking decisive action to end the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2030, with all vehicles being required to have a significant zero emissions capability (e.g. plug-in and full hybrids) from 2030 and be 100% zero emissions from 2035," the plan read.

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"We must take advantage of the once in a generation opportunity to build a world-leading [electric vehicle] supply chain here in the UK and improve air quality in our towns and cities," it continued.

The ambitious move is in stark contrast to the environmental policy pursued by President TrumpDonald TrumpIran claims U.S. to lift all oil sanctions but State Department says 'nothing is agreed' Ivanka Trump, Kushner distance themselves from Trump claims on election: CNN Overnight Defense: Joint Chiefs chairman clashes with GOP on critical race theory | House bill introduced to overhaul military justice system as sexual assault reform builds momentum MORE's administration, which pulled out of the Paris climate agreement in mid-2017 and has traditionally struck a tone of skepticism toward the issue of man-made climate change.

The president himself is a vocal critic of the Green New Deal, a plan touted by progressives, including its main sponsors, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHouse Democrats unveil spending bill to boost staff pay, maintain lawmaker pay freeze Five takeaways from New York's primaries Ocasio-Cortez says she ranked Wiley first, Stringer second in NYC mayoral vote MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed MarkeyEd Markey'Fairplay' to launch campaign for children's online protection 'Killibuster': Democratic angst grows as filibuster threatens agenda Biden risks break with progressives on infrastructure MORE (D-Mass.), as a jobs-focused program that would shift the U.S. away from fossil fuels toward clean energy usage.

Trump and Johnson are seen as close allies, though the British prime minister recently congratulated Trump's opponent, President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenSchumer vows to advance two-pronged infrastructure plan next month Biden appoints veteran housing, banking regulator as acting FHFA chief Iran claims U.S. to lift all oil sanctions but State Department says 'nothing is agreed' MORE, on his election victory despite Trump's refusal to concede and his attempts to legally challenge the results in several states.