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FAA nominee advances to full Senate vote

FAA nominee advances to full Senate vote

The Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee voted Wednesday to advance President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to hold virtual bilateral meeting with Mexican president More than 300 charged in connection to Capitol riot Trump Jr.: There are 'plenty' of GOP incumbents who should be challenged MORE's nominee to lead the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), former Delta executive Stephen Dickson, to a vote before the full Senate. 

The committee vote was 14-12 along party lines and came as Democrats raised concerns about Dickson.

Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellRegulators keep close eye on Facebook's deal with Australia Video stirs emotions on Trump trial's first day Airlines warn of new furloughs without more federal aid MORE (Wash.), the committee's top Democrat, said that Dickson was involved in alleged retaliation against a Delta pilot who brought up safety concerns. 

She said that the pilot was made to see a psychiatrist who declared her manic and removed her from flying after she allegedly told Delta about issues with automation and pilot training.

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Cantwell said that a congressional investigation found that Dickson "did know, was involved with this pilot, did know what was happening, and failed to disclose it to this committee.”

Chairman Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerPassage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act is the first step to heal our democracy Overnight Health Care: US surpasses half a million COVID deaths | House panel advances Biden's .9T COVID-19 aid bill | Johnson & Johnson ready to provide doses for 20M Americans by end of March 11 GOP senators slam Biden pick for health secretary: 'No meaningful experience' MORE (R-Miss.), however, praised Dickson's Air Force service and his experience at Delta. 

“He will bring commitment, experience and expertise necessary to lead the FAA,” he said, adding that Dixon was never accused of retaliation during his tenure at Delta.

As of Wednesday afternoon, a vote to confirm Dickson by the full Senate had not been scheduled. 

The FAA has faced increased scrutiny in recent weeks due to its past approval of Boeing 737 Max planes. In the last year, two such planes have crashed in other countries, resulting in 346 deaths.

The U.S. and other countries have grounded the planes.