New regs for Tuesday: Pool pumps, marbled murrelets, nuclear power plants

New regs for Tuesday: Pool pumps, marbled murrelets, nuclear power plants
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In Tuesday’s edition of the Federal Register, the Department of Energy asks the public to help it decide whether to regulate pool pumps, the Fish & Wildlife Service requests comments on the areas it has designated critical habitat for marbled murrelets and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission gives the public more time to comment on its plan to issue new standards for nuclear power plants.

Pool pumps: The Department of Energy is forming a committee to decide whether energy conservation standards and a new test procedure are needed for dedicated purpose pool pumps.

The agency said the working group would be made up of those who have a ”defined stake” in the outcome of the proposed standards and amended test procedure, which will consult with a range of experts on technical issues. 

The agency will hold two public meetings and webinars on Sept. 9 and on Oct. 1 at its D.C. office. The public also has 14 days to submit written comments.

Marbled murrelet: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) is asking the public to comment on the areas in Washington, Oregon and California it has designated as a critical habitat for marbled murrelet.

The current designation includes 3.7 million acres, but the agency is asking for help determining whether all of that area meets the statutory definition of critical habitat.

Marbled murrelet is a small, North Pacific seabird bird with a short neck that nests in the undergrowth of the forest floor. The agency said it originally listed the marbled murrelet as threatened because deforestation was wiping out nesting habitat. 

The public has 60 days to submit comments to FWS.

Power plants: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is giving the public more time to comment on its plan to issue new regulations for how licensed power plants are meeting the “as low as reasonably achievable” standard for the radioactive liquid waste they discharged.

Public comments were originally due Sept. 1, but the commission said it received a request for an extension and is now giving the public an additional 30 days. Comments should be filed no later than Oct. 1.