Ginsburg dismisses court packing and term limits for Supreme Court justices

Ginsburg dismisses court packing and term limits for Supreme Court justices

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgJustices appear divided over expanding police officers' traffic stop power Loaded poll questions harm civil discourse Clintons tell Ginsburg they struggled to complete 'RBG workout' MORE on Tuesday dismissed proposals to pack the court and put term limits on justices, two controversial ideas for reforming the Supreme Court.

"Nine seems to be a good number. It's been that way for a long time," Ginsburg said, speaking to NPR.

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Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderObama celebrates 'great night for our country' after Democrats' victories in Virginia and Kentucky After Obama-era abuses, Republican hysteria over impeachment process is absurd Lawmakers come together to honor Cummings: 'One of the greats in our country's history' MORE and 2020 Democratic candidates like South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegDemocrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Saagar Enjeti rips Buttigieg for praising Obama after misquote Krystal Ball credits Gabbard's upswing in 2020 race to 'feckless' Democratic establishment MORE and former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke have recently elevated the idea of expanding the court beyond nine justices.

"I think it was a bad idea when President Franklin Roosevelt tried to pack the court," Ginsburg noted.

In 1937, Roosevelt proposed expanding the court to as many as 15 judges in a plan that was delayed by a Senate committee. At the time it was speculated that Roosevelt's proposal put political pressure on the justices in cases before the court.

Ginsburg in the interview also dismissed the idea of term limits for justices, a concept that gained renewed bipartisan interest late last year amid concerns over the health of older justices. 

"Our Constitution is powerfully hard to amend," Ginsburg said, noting it calls for life terms for federal judges.