House Intel concludes Russia probe interviews: reports

House Intel concludes Russia probe interviews: reports
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The House Intelligence Committee has finished interviewing witnesses as part of its investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential race, a likely sign the probe is coming to an end, according to reports.

Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayOn The Money: House chairman issues subpoenas for Trump's tax returns | Trump touts trade talks as China, US fail to reach deal | Five things to know about Trump's trade war with China | GOP offers support for Trump on tariffs GOP offers support for Trump on China tariffs On The Money: New tariffs on China pose major risk for Trump | Senators sound alarm over looming budget battles | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders team up against payday lenders MORE (R-Texas), who is overseeing the panel's investigation, is expected to announce on Monday that the committee will move on to writing its final report based on the interviews, a source told CNN.

A spokesperson for Conaway declined to comment to the news outlet.

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Democrats have previously said that the Republican-led investigation was not as extensive as they would have liked and that more witnesses needed to be interviewed. They said that the final interviews were rushed and the committee was too lenient in its questioning of witnesses.

While the committee did not interview President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls for Republicans to be 'united' on abortion Tlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Facebook temporarily suspended conservative commentator Candace Owens MORE, it interviewed some of his closest aides, including former campaign manager Corey LewandowskiCorey R. LewandowskiClinton lawyer: Mueller's failure to draw conclusion on obstruction a 'massive dereliction' of duty Mueller's facts vs Trump's spin The time has come for the Democrats to act, finally MORE, former chief strategist Stephen Bannon, Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpUkraine's top prosecutor says no evidence of wrongdoing by Bidens New financial disclosure forms provide glimpses of Trump's wealth Trump's Doral resort revenue has dropped since presidential campaign: report MORE and son-in-law and senior adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerTrump: 'Good chance' Dems give immigration 'win' after Pelosi called White House plan 'dead on arrival' The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition — Trump: GOP has `clear contrast' with Dems on immigration Trump's immigration push faces Capitol Hill buzzsaw MORE.

Relations between Democrats and Republicans on the House panel have been fraught, with much of the spotlight centering on tensions between committee Chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesOvernight Defense: Congressional leaders receive classified briefing on Iran | Trump on war: 'I hope not' | Key Republican calls threats credible | Warren plan targets corporate influence at Pentagon Schiff says DOJ hasn't complied with subpoena for Mueller report Key Republican 'convinced' Iran threats are credible MORE (Calif.) and ranking member Adam SchiffAdam Bennett Schiff5 things to watch as Trump, Dems clash over investigations Mueller mystery: Will he ever testify to Congress? Overnight Defense: Congressional leaders receive classified briefing on Iran | Trump on war: 'I hope not' | Key Republican calls threats credible | Warren plan targets corporate influence at Pentagon MORE (D-Calif.). Those partisan tensions came to a head earlier this year with the release of competing memos, one crafted by Republicans and the other by Democrats, concerning alleged surveillance abuses by the FBI and Justice Department.

According to CNN, the committee is expected to produce two reports: a Republican one arguing that no evidence of collusion was found, and a Democratic one making the case for possible collusion and calling for further investigation.

The Senate Intelligence Committee and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE are currently carrying out their own separate investigations into Russian meddling and possible collusion during the 2016 election.