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House Intel concludes Russia probe interviews: reports

House Intel concludes Russia probe interviews: reports
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The House Intelligence Committee has finished interviewing witnesses as part of its investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential race, a likely sign the probe is coming to an end, according to reports.

Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayThompson named top Republican on Agriculture Bottom line House Republican introduces amendment to include farm aid in stopgap funding bill MORE (R-Texas), who is overseeing the panel's investigation, is expected to announce on Monday that the committee will move on to writing its final report based on the interviews, a source told CNN.

A spokesperson for Conaway declined to comment to the news outlet.

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Democrats have previously said that the Republican-led investigation was not as extensive as they would have liked and that more witnesses needed to be interviewed. They said that the final interviews were rushed and the committee was too lenient in its questioning of witnesses.

While the committee did not interview President TrumpDonald TrumpClinton, Bush, Obama reflect on peaceful transition of power on Biden's Inauguration Day Arizona Republican's brothers say he is 'at least partially to blame' for Capitol violence Biden reverses Trump's freeze on .4 billion in funds MORE, it interviewed some of his closest aides, including former campaign manager Corey LewandowskiCorey LewandowskiSunday shows preview: Riots roil Washington as calls for Trump's removal grow Trump's refusal to concede sows confusion among staff Trump selects Hicks, Bondi, Grenell and other allies for positions MORE, former chief strategist Stephen Bannon, Donald Trump Jr.Don TrumpSinger Taylor Dayne responds to criticism after Mar-a-Lago performance: 'I try to stay non-political' More voters say pardons for Trump's family would be inappropriate: poll Trump pardon scandal would doom his 2024 campaign MORE and son-in-law and senior adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerTrump grants clemency to more than 100 people, including Bannon Pardon talk intensifies as Trump approaches final 24 hours in office Trump preparing another 100 pardons, commutations before leaving office: reports MORE.

Relations between Democrats and Republicans on the House panel have been fraught, with much of the spotlight centering on tensions between committee Chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesGOP operative installed as NSA top lawyer placed on administrative leave: reports Pelosi raises alarm after Trump loyalist installed as top NSA lawyer NSA places former GOP political operative in top lawyer position after Pentagon chief's reported order MORE (Calif.) and ranking member Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffBiden urged to reverse Pompeo-Trump move on Houthis Angus King warns of 'grave danger' of Trump revealing classified information Schiff says 'massive intelligence and security failure' led to Capitol breach MORE (D-Calif.). Those partisan tensions came to a head earlier this year with the release of competing memos, one crafted by Republicans and the other by Democrats, concerning alleged surveillance abuses by the FBI and Justice Department.

According to CNN, the committee is expected to produce two reports: a Republican one arguing that no evidence of collusion was found, and a Democratic one making the case for possible collusion and calling for further investigation.

The Senate Intelligence Committee and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE are currently carrying out their own separate investigations into Russian meddling and possible collusion during the 2016 election.