GM officially sells Ohio plant, months after Trump touted sale

GM officially sells Ohio plant, months after Trump touted sale
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General Motors has sold its Lordstown, Ohio, plant to electric truck manufacturer Lordstown Motors Corp. about six months after President TrumpDonald John TrumpWatergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump In private moment with Trump, Justice Kennedy pushed for Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination: book Obama: 'Everybody needs to chill out' about differences between 2020 candidates MORE hailed the deal on Twitter, according to Bloomberg.

The announcement comes a year after GM said it would not allocate any future product to the now-shuttered plant. Trump, who has seized on the plant as a symbol of economic prosperity during his presidency, announced the sale in May over Twitter, saying he had spoken to GM CEO Mary Barra about the deal.

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GM confirmed shortly after the tweets that it was in discussions at the time with Workhorse, which is affiliated with Lordstown Motors but does not share ownership, saying the sale "has the potential to bring significant production and electric vehicle assembly jobs to the plant.”

The sale comes as Workhorse is bidding for a contract to manufacture electric mail trucks for the U.S. Postal Service, according to Bloomberg, although it’s not guaranteed the vehicles would be made at the Lordstown plant if the company wins the contract.

Lordstown Motors, meanwhile, is seeking a cash infusion to produce its debut model, the Endurance, a four-motor vehicle with fewer moving parts than a standard pickup and possibly require fewer repairs for fleet operators,

“We are going to be fundraising for a while,” Lordstown Motors CEO Steve Burns, former head of Workhorse, told Bloomberg. “We have to stand up an auto company.”

A contract between GM and the United Auto Workers reached last month allowed the automaker to permanently close the Lordstown plant.

“GM’s unilateral decision this year to close Lordstown and their continued refusal to bring a new product to the plant is a betrayal of the Mahoning Valley,” Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownHillicon Valley: Commerce extends Huawei waiver | Senate Dems unveil privacy bill priorities | House funding measure extends surveillance program | Trump to tour Apple factory | GOP bill would restrict US data going to China Senate Democrats unveil priorities for federal privacy bill On The Money: Trump asks Supreme Court to block Dem subpoena for financial records | Kudlow 'very optimistic' for new NAFTA deal | House passes Ex-Im Bank bill opposed by Trump, McConnell MORE (D-Ohio) said in a statement in September.

“Lordstown auto workers are the best at what they do, and I will continue to stand with them, their families, and the entire community as we fight to bring good, UAW auto jobs to the Valley,” he added.