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Kamala Harris slams Sessions on criminal justice

Kamala Harris slams Sessions on criminal justice
© Keren Carrion

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) slammed Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTime to bring federal employees home for every holiday Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future Tuberville incorrectly says Gore was president-elect in 2000 MORE for his tough-on-crime policies during an event early Tuesday focused on the rising rate of women in the nation’s prisons.

Harris, a key speaker at Women Unshackled, an event coordinated by the Justice Action Network, the Brennan Center for Justice and The Coalition for Public Safety, said America should be smart on crime instead of being tough or soft.

“The answer is not to build more prisons and the answer is certainly not to privatize those prisons,” she said as the audience erupted in cheers. “And the answer, Jeff Sessions, is not to return to relying on mandatory minimum sentences.”

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Sessions issued a memo in May directing federal prosecutors to “pursue the most serious, readily provable" offenses that by definition “carry the most substantial guidelines sentence, including mandatory minimums."

The marching orders were a drastic shift from the orders former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderEx-AG Holder urges GOP to speak against Trump efforts to 'subvert' election results Tyson Foods suspends Iowa plant officials amid coronavirus scandal Money can't buy the Senate MORE issued in 2013 under President Obama that urged federal prosecutors to be more lenient with nonviolent, low-level drug offenders and reserve the harshest charges for violent criminals and the leaders of drug cartels.

As one of his first acts as attorney general, Sessions rescinded an Obama-era plan to phase out the federal government’s use of private prisons. Sessions sent a memo in February directing the Bureau of Prisons to continue to use private prisons.

Harris said on Tuesday that America needs to think about the way we’re treating women before, during and after incarceration.

Harris, along with Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Warren, Brown voice support for controversial Biden budget office pick Biden's economic team gets mixed reviews from Senate Republicans MORE (D-Mass.), Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Dick DurbinDick DurbinOvernight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases Bipartisan Senate group holding coronavirus relief talks amid stalemate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - COVID-19 fears surround Thanksgiving holiday MORE (D-Ill.), introduced legislation last week to reform the way women are treated behind bars.

In many prisons, Harris said, women lack basic hygiene or reproductive health, are subject to threats of sexual violence when supervised by male guards in bathrooms or showers, and are shackled while pregnant and, in some states, while giving birth.

“The Dignity for Incarcerated Women Act will address some of these issues,” she said.

The bill bans the shackling of pregnant women, requires the Bureau of Prisons to create better visitation policies for parents, provide parenting classes, and offer health products like tampons and pads free of charge. The bill also restricts prison employees from entering restrooms of the opposite sex unless the there are pressing circumstances, among other things.

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