Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees

Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees
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The battle between Senate Democrats and Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleySenate panel reaches tentative deal for Kavanaugh accuser to testify Thursday Kavanaugh accuser agrees to testify next week Aide for GOP involved in Kavanaugh nomination resigns after past sexual harassment allegation surfaces MORE (R-Iowa) over the “blue-slip rule” escalated this week, after another one of President TrumpDonald John TrumpSunday shows preview: Trump sells U.N. reorganizing and Kavanaugh allegations dominate Ex-Trump staffer out at CNN amid “false and defamatory accusations” Democrats opposed to Pelosi lack challenger to topple her MORE’s judicial nominees advanced without the approval of both of their home-state senators

The blue-slip rule — which Democrats describe as a long-running Senate tradition Grassley has taken to ignore — has become a flashpoint for members on the Judiciary Committee. The committee has been tasked with considering the slew of nominees from the Trump administration, many of which have been controversial.

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSunday shows preview: Trump sells U.N. reorganizing and Kavanaugh allegations dominate The Memo: Could Kavanaugh furor spark another ‘year of the woman’? Sexual assault is not a game — stop using women to score political points MORE (D-Calif.), the committee’s top Democrat, said that Grassley’s decision to hold nomination hearings and approve two nominees who lacked a blue slip from a home-state senator marked a landmark change in committee tradition.

Home-state senators have historically been able to block nominees by refusing to return a blue paper of approval to the committee. It’s a courtesy, rather than a formal Senate rule, and whether it’s followed is entirely up to whoever helms the Judiciary Committee — in this case, Grassley.

Last month, David Stras became the first appellate court nominee to be confirmed despite missing a blue slip. Grassley moved his nomination to the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals through the committee without the approval of then-Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenNelson campaign to donate K from Al Franken group to charity Sexual assault is not a game — stop using women to score political points Election Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls MORE (D-Minn.). 

Now another judicial nominee is headed to the floor. 

On Thursday, the committee voted 11-10, along party lines, to approve Michael Brennan to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinDems seek to rebuild blue wall in Rust Belt contests The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — The Hill interviews President Trump Poll: Democrats inch forward in Wisconsin MORE (D-Wis.) did not return her blue slip for Brennan because he failed to receive the requisite support from the state’s bipartisan commission that vets potential candidates for federal judgeships. 

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyDem senator praises Ford opening the door to testifying Ford opens door to testifying next week Senate Democrats increase pressure for FBI investigation of Kavanaugh MORE (D-Vt.) appeared fed up Thursday that another nominee was advancing without both blue slips.  

“This basically says we don’t care which state you represent, you’re irrelevant as senators, we’ll forget the 100 years of senators having involvement,” he said. 

“I hope the senators realize what you’re doing,” he added. 

In a statement Friday, Baldwin said she’s disappointed Grassley endorsed Trump’s decision to disregard the Wisconsin Federal Nominating Commission.

“I fear yesterday’s vote has set a troubling precedent for the Judiciary Committee and the Senate,” she said.  

“Advancing this nomination without my blue slip sends the message to my colleagues that President Trump need not respect their roles as home-state Senators in the selection of judicial nominees.”                    

At Thursday’s hearing, the chairman said the lack of two positive blue slips wouldn’t necessarily prevent a circuit court nominee from receiving a hearing unless the White House failed to consult with home-state senators.

“This has been the policy of all but two of the 18 Senate Judiciary Committee chairmen over the last 100 years that the blue slip has been a practice of this committee,” he said.

“In the case that’s before us, the White House consulted with both Wisconsin senators. The White House considered two candidates suggested by Sen. Baldwin, but the president opted for Judge Brennan. That’s the president’s prerogative under the Constitution.”

The committee noted in an April memo that Leahy and the late Sen. James Eastland (D-Miss.) are the only senators that adhered to a strict two positive blue-slip policy before moving forward on a nominee.

“In fact, Leahy refused to hold hearings on six of George W. Bush’s circuit nominees even though all of them had the support of their home-state senators,” Grassley spokesman Taylor Foy said in a statement to The Hill.  

"It’s false to claim that Chairman Grassley is ignoring the blue slip tradition or that home-state senators are irrelevant in that process," he said. "In fact, he has worked closely with many of those home-state senators to ensure adequate consultation." 

Carrie Severino, chief counsel and policy director of the conservative Judicial Crisis Network, called the Democrats’ blue-slip arguments ahistorical nonsense.

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“There’s no major change here to be concerned about,” she said. “They are trying to weaponize every bit of Senate procedure they can to put the brakes on anything the Senate is trying to do, particularly nominations." 

But Nan Aron, founder and president of the liberal Alliance for Justice, said Republicans are trampling the rights of not only the home-state senators, but also their constituents.

“This is further destruction of the tradition and norms of the Senate and the rights of people who elect their senators in part to have a voice in federal judgeships,” she said. 

And it’s likely to continue. 

Another showdown is looming over Ryan Bounds, Trump’s latest pick for the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. 

Oregon Sens. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: NYT says Rosenstein wanted to wear wire on Trump | Twitter bug shared some private messages | Vendor put remote-access software on voting machines | Paypal cuts ties with Infowars | Google warned senators about foreign hacks Overnight Health Care: Opioids package nears finish line | Measure to help drug companies draws ire | Maryland ObamaCare rates to drop Google says senators' Gmail accounts targeted by foreign hackers MORE (D) and Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyOvernight Energy: Warren bill would force companies to disclose climate impacts | Green group backs Gillum in Florida gov race | Feds to open refuge near former nuke site Warren wants companies to disclose more about climate change impacts DHS transferred about 0M from separate agencies to ICE this year: report MORE (D) have said they will not return blue slips for Bounds, who is an assistant U.S. attorney in Portland, even though Bounds’s name was forwarded to the White House as one of the finalists for the vacancy.

While a student at Stanford University, Bounds wrote opinion pieces for the student newspaper in which he expressed disdain for “race-focused groups,” according to the Alliance for Justice.