FEATURED:

Witnesses say Ford may have mistaken them for Kavanaugh

Senate Judiciary Committee investigators spoke to two men earlier this week who believe they may have been involved in the alleged sexual assault at the center of Christine Blasey Ford's accusations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the committee said late Wednesday.

Staff for the committee's chairman, Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyClinton's security clearance withdrawn at her request Kavanaugh tensions linger after bitter fight Senate heads home to campaign after deal on Trump nominees MORE (R-Iowa), said that during a review of Ford's claims that Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed and groped her during a 1980s high school party, two men came forward to suggest it was a case of mistaken identity.

ADVERTISEMENT

On Monday, a man submitted a written statement and spoke with staff from the Judiciary Committee after he claimed he believes he may have been involved in the alleged incident with Ford. He spoke again with investigators on Tuesday and described his recollection of his interaction with Ford.

On Wednesday, the man provided a more in-depth written statement, the panel said. On the same day, investigators from the committee spoke over the phone with a second man who believes he should be the target of Ford's allegation, not Kavanaugh.  

The men were not identified by the committee, and spokesmen for Grassley didn't immediately respond to a request for information about the two individuals.

But aides for Democrats on the Judiciary Committee appeared caught off guard by the summary released by Republican staffers, saying they had no idea Republicans were speaking to the two men who claimed they, not Kavanaugh, had "encounters" with Ford.

Lily Adams, a spokeswoman for Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden leads crowded field of Dems in potential 2020 matchup: poll Kamala Harris to campaign in Iowa for first time Harris accuses GOP of ‘weaponizing’ 2020 Census MORE (D-Calif.), said they found out about the interviews from reporters on Twitter.

"What the Judiciary Republicans are doing tonight is both pathetic and completely unsurprising," she added in a subsequent tweet, saying Republicans were "releasing random doppelgänger ... to try to muddy waters."

A Democratic aide, asked about the timeline from Republicans, said Democrats weren't informed of the assertions or the interviews "in violation of Senate rules. This is shameful and the height of irresponsibility."

"Republicans are flailing. They are desperately trying to muddy the waters, having tried and failed to bully and discredit Dr. Blasey Ford," the aide added. "If Republicans had any respect for the very credible women who have come forward or faith in Judge Kavanaugh, they would ask the FBI to investigate. They have refused to do so at every turn."

Ford and Kavanaugh are set to testify Thursday about her allegation.

Kavanaugh will "categorically and unequivocally" deny the sexual assault allegations that have threatened to derail his nomination, according to prepared remarks.

Ford's prepared remarks show she will provide a detailed account of the alleged incident, including her belief that Kavanaugh was going to rape her.

Since Ford came forward, two other women have accused Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct.

Deborah Ramirez alleged that he exposed himself to her during a college party in the 1980s, while Julie Swetnick claimed Kavanaugh and his friends attempted to intoxicate women so they could be "gang raped."

Kavanaugh has fiercely denied all three claims, calling them part of a "smear" against his nomination.