Trump, first lady attend special Supreme Court ceremony for Kavanaugh

Trump, first lady attend special Supreme Court ceremony for Kavanaugh
© Fred Schilling, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTed Cruz knocks New York Times for 'stunning' correction on Kavanaugh report US service member killed in Afghanistan Pro-Trump website edited British reality star's picture to show him wearing Trump hat MORE and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump takes 2020 roadshow to New Mexico Melania Trump to attend reopening of Washington Monument Former speechwriter says Michelle Obama came up with 'when they go low we go high' line MORE attended a special ceremony for Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughTed Cruz knocks New York Times for 'stunning' correction on Kavanaugh report Kavanaugh remains guilty until proven innocent, according to Democrats The Hill's 12:30 Report: NY Times story sparks new firestorm over Kavanaugh MORE at the Supreme Court on Thursday.

The off-camera event, known as an investiture, is a welcoming ceremony of sorts for the new justice, who is Trump’s second successful nomination to the high court.

Invited guests included elite and well-known members of Washington’s conservative legal and political circles.

Those in attendance included Federalist Society Executive Vice President Leonard Leo, former White House Counsel Don McGahn, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: NY Times story sparks new firestorm over Kavanaugh Senator asked FBI to follow up on new information about Kavanaugh last year Congress must reinstate assault weapons ban MORE (R-Ky.) and his wife Transportation Secretary Elaine ChaoElaine Lan ChaoTrump awards Medal of Valor, civilian honors to responders in Dayton and El Paso shootings Democrats ask Chao to promote airline price competition Trump administration takes step to relax truck driver time regulations MORE, former Clinton independent counsel Kenneth Starr and Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump takes 2020 roadshow to New Mexico Bolton exit provokes questions about Trump shift on Iran The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation MORE (R-S.C.).

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Kavanaugh's former colleagues on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, including Chief Judge Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandSupreme Court comes to Trump's aid on immigration Gorsuch: Those who don't have 'great confidence in America' should 'look elsewhere' Trump stacking lower courts MORE, also attended the event. Former President Obama nominated Garland to the Supreme Court to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia, but Republicans refused to hold a hearing or vote on his nomination, holding the seat open until after the 2016 presidential election.

Newly appointed Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker was also there. In an authoritative tone, he made the formal request for Kavanaugh’s commission to be read and accepted by the court.

The court clerk said the commission was signed by former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHouse Democrats seeking Sessions's testimony in impeachment probe McCabe's counsel presses US attorney on whether grand jury decided not to indict US attorney recommends moving forward with charges against McCabe after DOJ rejects his appeal MORE, who resigned upon the president request less than 24 hours ago.

Whitaker sat at counsel’s table in the front of the courtroom beside Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinHouse Democrats seeking Sessions's testimony in impeachment probe McCabe's counsel presses US attorney on whether grand jury decided not to indict US attorney recommends moving forward with charges against McCabe after DOJ rejects his appeal MORE and Solicitor General Noel Francisco.

President Trump and the first lady were seated next to retired Justice Anthony Kennedy, whom Kavanaugh has replaced on the court.

Trump did not display emotion throughout the 20-minute ceremony in the courtroom, where he earned a big win last term. The justices voted to uphold his travel ban on people from five majority-Muslim countries from entering the United States in June.

Trump has now asked the justices to wade into legal fights over his administration’s decision to rescind the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy. The program has protected people brought to the country illegally as children from deportation.

Trump was also present for the investiture ceremony of his first Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch. Unlike Gorsuch, however, Kavanaugh did not take the traditional walk down the courthouse steps following the ceremony.

In a statement last week, Supreme Court Public Information Officer Kathy Arberg said there would be no photo opportunity due to security concerns. The walk is usually a chance for the media to get a picture of the new justice and his family.

The court said every justice since Justice John Paul Stevens in 1975 had walked down the steps.

Kavanaugh smiled as he entered the courtroom for Thursday's proceedings with his wife and took his seat in the ceremonial chair used by Chief Justice John Marshall during the early 19th century.

It was one of the few times Kavanaugh is likely to sit in front of the bench rather than behind it.

After the commission was read, Chief Justice John Roberts swore Kavanaugh in for a second time. Roberts administered the Constitutional oath at the courthouse on Oct. 6 after Kavanaugh was confirmed by the Senate.

Kennedy administered the oath later that same day in a private ceremony in the justice’s conference room and two days later President Trump held a prime-time swearing in event at the White House, which was attended by the Kavanaugh's new colleagues on the court.

On Thursday, Roberts administered the Judicial Oath again. The ceremony marked the fourth time Kavanaugh has been sworn in to his new, lifetime role.

On behalf of the justices, Roberts wished Kavanaugh a "long and happy career in our common calling."

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who fractured three ribs in a fall in her office, was absent from Thursday's proceedings.

The Supreme Court's Public Information Office said Ginsburg went home Wednesday night after falling, but called Supreme Court Police to take her to a hospital early Thursday after experiencing discomfort overnight.

Ginsburg is being treated at George Washington University Hospital.

--This report was updated at 11:55 a.m.