Court extends Mueller grand jury

Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE’s Washington-based grand jury has been granted an extension days before it was set to expire by the head judge on the federal district court for the District of Columbia.

Lisa Klem, special assistant to Chief Judge Beryl Howell, confirmed for The Hill that the grand jury has been extended and can continue to sit, but she did not provide any length of time for the extension.

CNN reported Friday that that the federal grand jury had been extended by six months, but Klem said the court has not confirmed an end date or length of extension, including to CNN.

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The special counsel's office declined to comment on the extension.

Sunday will mark 18 months since the federal grand jury was impaneled on July 6, 2017. Under the rules for federal criminal procedure, a federal grand jury can can only serve up to 18 months unless the court determines that an extension is in the public interest.

The rules, however, say an extension can't be granted for more than six months.

The Wall Street Journal first reported in early August 2017 that Mueller had impaneled a grand jury in D.C. as he investigates Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Multiple individuals are known to have testified before the grand jury as part of Mueller’s sprawling inquiry into Russian interference and whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Moscow to meddle in the 2016 vote. These include associates of longtime Trump ally Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneMeet Trump's most trusted pollsters 3 real problems Republicans need to address to win in 2020 Judge rejects Stone's request to dismiss charges MORE and one-time Trump campaign aide Sam Nunberg.

Since he was appointed special counsel in May 2017, Mueller has indicted more than two dozen Russians for meddling in the election using hacking and social media.

The special counsel has also secured guilty pleas from several Trump associates, including former national security adviser Michael Flynn and former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortRand Paul calls for probe of Democrats over Ukraine letter He who must not be named: How Hunter Biden became a conversation-stopper Schiff should consider using RICO framework to organize impeachment MORE. Those who are cooperating in the investigation are likely to testify before the grand jury, though the proceedings are secret.

Mueller’s investigation has pressed on for more than 19 months amid attacks from President TrumpDonald John TrumpWHCA calls on Trump to denounce video depicting him shooting media outlets Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Trump hits Fox News's Chris Wallace over Ukraine coverage MORE, who views the probe as a partisan “witch hunt” against him and has publicly called for its end.

Trump has long denied there was collusion between his campaign in Moscow, telling reporters Friday afternoon, “I didn’t need Russians to help me win Iowa” or Wisconsin.