Ginsburg calls proposal to eliminate Electoral College 'more theoretical than real'

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgKatie Couric says she felt 'betrayed' by Lauer after sexual assault allegations Couric defends editing of RBG interview Biden's Supreme Court commission ends not with a bang but a whimper MORE on Monday called eliminating the Electoral College more "theoretical than real" due to the difficulty of amending the Constitution. 

“It’s largely a dream because our Constitution is ... hard to amend,” Ginsburg said at the University of Chicago, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. “I know that from experience.” 

Ginsburg, one of the court's liberal justices, has previously said she would support getting rid of the Electoral College.

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"There are some things I would like to change, one is the Electoral College,” Ginsburg said in 2017. “But that would require a constitutional amendment, and amending our Constitution is powerfully hard to do.”

The Electoral College came under renewed scrutiny following the 2016 presidential election, when Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonI voted for Trump in 2020 — he proved to be the ultimate RINO in 2021 Neera Tanden tapped as White House staff secretary Meghan McCain: 'SNL' parodies made me feel like 'laughing stock of the country' MORE won the popular vote but Donald TrumpDonald TrumpHillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — Twitter's algorithm boosts right-leaning content, internal study finds Ohio Democrat calls Vance an 'ass----' over Baldwin tweet Matt Taibbi says Trump's rhetoric caused public perception of US intelligence services to shift MORE won the presidency due to the Electoral College. Similarly, George W. Bush became president in 2000 despite losing the popular vote to Democratic opponent Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreMcAuliffe on 2000 election: 'I wish the United States Supreme Court had let them finish counting the votes' All Democrats must compromise to pass economic plans, just like 1993 Amy Coney Barrett sullies the Supreme Court MORE

Ginsburg has made a series of public appearances following a Supreme Court announcement that she had undergone cancer treatment. 

The Supreme Court's next term is slated to begin on Oct. 7.