Ginsburg calls proposal to eliminate Electoral College 'more theoretical than real'

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgIt wasn't just religious liberty that Chief Justice Roberts strangled Speculation swirls about next Supreme Court vacancy Supreme Court divided over fight for Trump's financial records   MORE on Monday called eliminating the Electoral College more "theoretical than real" due to the difficulty of amending the Constitution. 

“It’s largely a dream because our Constitution is ... hard to amend,” Ginsburg said at the University of Chicago, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. “I know that from experience.” 

Ginsburg, one of the court's liberal justices, has previously said she would support getting rid of the Electoral College.

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"There are some things I would like to change, one is the Electoral College,” Ginsburg said in 2017. “But that would require a constitutional amendment, and amending our Constitution is powerfully hard to do.”

The Electoral College came under renewed scrutiny following the 2016 presidential election, when Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden opens widest lead over Trump in online betting markets Trump, Biden battle to shape opinion on scenes of unrest Sessions accepts 'Fox News Sunday' invitation to debate, Tuberville declines MORE won the popular vote but Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpFormer employees critique EPA under Trump in new report Fired State Department watchdog says Pompeo aide attempted to 'bully' him over investigations Virginia senator calls for Barr to resign over order to clear protests MORE won the presidency due to the Electoral College. Similarly, George W. Bush became president in 2000 despite losing the popular vote to Democratic opponent Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreCNN coronavirus town hall to feature science author David Quammen, 'Empire' actress Taraji Henson Top Democratic pollster advised Biden campaign to pick Warren as VP Melania Trump to appear on CNN coronavirus town hall Thursday night MORE

Ginsburg has made a series of public appearances following a Supreme Court announcement that she had undergone cancer treatment. 

The Supreme Court's next term is slated to begin on Oct. 7.