Ginsburg calls proposal to eliminate Electoral College 'more theoretical than real'

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgGinsburg says she never stopped working out after latest cancer diagnosis Majority disapprove of Trump Supreme Court nominations, says poll Buttigieg defends court-packing proposal at Democratic debate MORE on Monday called eliminating the Electoral College more "theoretical than real" due to the difficulty of amending the Constitution. 

“It’s largely a dream because our Constitution is ... hard to amend,” Ginsburg said at the University of Chicago, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. “I know that from experience.” 

Ginsburg, one of the court's liberal justices, has previously said she would support getting rid of the Electoral College.

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"There are some things I would like to change, one is the Electoral College,” Ginsburg said in 2017. “But that would require a constitutional amendment, and amending our Constitution is powerfully hard to do.”

The Electoral College came under renewed scrutiny following the 2016 presidential election, when Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Memo: Trump 'lynching' firestorm is sign of things to come Hillary Clinton has said she'd consider 2020 race if she thought she could win: report Nielsen on leaving Trump administration: 'Saying no and refusing to do it myself was not going to be enough' MORE won the popular vote but Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham to introduce resolution condemning House impeachment inquiry Support for impeachment inches up in poll Fox News's Bret Baier calls Trump's attacks on media 'a problem' MORE won the presidency due to the Electoral College. Similarly, George W. Bush became president in 2000 despite losing the popular vote to Democratic opponent Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold Gore2020 general election debates announced Odds place Greta Thunberg as front-runner for this year's Nobel Peace Prize Joe Lieberman's son running for Senate in Georgia MORE

Ginsburg has made a series of public appearances following a Supreme Court announcement that she had undergone cancer treatment. 

The Supreme Court's next term is slated to begin on Oct. 7.