Ginsburg calls proposal to eliminate Electoral College 'more theoretical than real'

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgNo, Justice Ginsburg, we don't need a constitutional amendment to protect equal rights for women New two-story mural of Ruth Bader Ginsburg unveiled in DC Supreme Court comes to Trump's aid on immigration MORE on Monday called eliminating the Electoral College more "theoretical than real" due to the difficulty of amending the Constitution. 

“It’s largely a dream because our Constitution is ... hard to amend,” Ginsburg said at the University of Chicago, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. “I know that from experience.” 

Ginsburg, one of the court's liberal justices, has previously said she would support getting rid of the Electoral College.

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"There are some things I would like to change, one is the Electoral College,” Ginsburg said in 2017. “But that would require a constitutional amendment, and amending our Constitution is powerfully hard to do.”

The Electoral College came under renewed scrutiny following the 2016 presidential election, when Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGiuliani says 'of course' he asked Ukraine to look into Biden seconds after denying it Sanders hits 1 million donors Democrats will not beat Trump without moderate policy ideas MORE won the popular vote but Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpMarine unit in Florida reportedly pushing to hold annual ball at Trump property Giuliani clashes with CNN's Cuomo, calls him a 'sellout' and the 'enemy' Giuliani says 'of course' he asked Ukraine to look into Biden seconds after denying it MORE won the presidency due to the Electoral College. Similarly, George W. Bush became president in 2000 despite losing the popular vote to Democratic opponent Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreGinsburg calls proposal to eliminate Electoral College 'more theoretical than real' Difference between primaries and caucuses matters in this election Emma Thompson pens op-ed on climate change: 'Everything depends on what we do now' MORE

Ginsburg has made a series of public appearances following a Supreme Court announcement that she had undergone cancer treatment. 

The Supreme Court's next term is slated to begin on Oct. 7.