SPONSORED:

Democratic impeachment investigators looking at whether Trump misled Mueller

Democrats are looking into President TrumpDonald John TrumpPennsylvania Supreme Court strikes down GOP bid to stop election certification Biden looks to career officials to restore trust, morale in government agencies Sunday shows preview: US health officials brace for post-holiday COVID-19 surge MORE’s potential obstruction of former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s probe, including whether the president misled Mueller, as part of the impeachment inquiry, a House Judiciary Committee counsel told a panel of federal circuit court judges on Monday.

House Democrats, who have repeatedly pushed for the urgent release of redacted grand jury materials stemming from Mueller’s probe into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, made the case for the documents’ continued relevance, even as the impeachment inquiry zeroes in on Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. 

In arguments before a panel of appellate judges of the D.C. Circuit Court, House attorney Douglas Letter cited the grand jury testimony of Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortFlynn spurs questions of who Trump might pardon next On The Money: Initial jobless claims rise for 2nd week | Dow dips below 30K | Mnuchin draws fire for COVID-19 relief move | Manhattan DA appeals dismissal of Manafort charges Manhattan DA appeals dismissal of Manafort charges to NY high court MORE in particular. Manafort’s statements could shed light on whether written responses Trump provided to the special counsel were untruthful, Letter said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump told Mueller he didn't recall discussing WikiLeaks with Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneFlynn spurs questions of who Trump might pardon next OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Trump pardons Flynn | Lawmakers lash out at decision | Pentagon nixes Thanksgiving dining hall meals due to COVID-19 Democratic impeachment leaders blast Trump's pardon of Flynn MORE, who was convicted of lying to Congress last week. 

But during Stone’s trial, Manafort’s deputy Rick GatesRick GatesHow to combat Putin's financial aggression Sunday shows preview: Trump COVID-19 diagnosis rocks Washington, 2020 election The Hill's 12:30 Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association -Trump enters debate week after NYT obtains his tax returns MORE testified that Trump and Stone had a phone conversation following WikiLeaks' publication of emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee. Afterwards, Trump told Gates that more information was coming, Gates testified.

Letter on Monday doubled down on an argument House Democrats made in a September filing in D.C. District Court that redacted grand jury testimony from Manafort and Gates “have direct bearing on whether the president was untruthful” to the special counsel.

The former special counsel’s 448-page report contains redacted passages detailing information gleaned during grand jury proceedings. The House Judiciary Committee is seeking a judicial order to lift the redactions. 

The D.C. Circuit Court last month granted the Justice Department’s request to temporarily block the release of grand jury materials while the case plays out in court.

Updated at 1:44 p.m.