Democratic impeachment investigators looking at whether Trump misled Mueller

Democrats are looking into President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer Sen. Heller to run for Nevada governor Overnight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right MORE’s potential obstruction of former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE’s probe, including whether the president misled Mueller, as part of the impeachment inquiry, a House Judiciary Committee counsel told a panel of federal circuit court judges on Monday.

House Democrats, who have repeatedly pushed for the urgent release of redacted grand jury materials stemming from Mueller’s probe into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, made the case for the documents’ continued relevance, even as the impeachment inquiry zeroes in on Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. 

In arguments before a panel of appellate judges of the D.C. Circuit Court, House attorney Douglas Letter cited the grand jury testimony of Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortDOJ investigating one-time Trump campaign adviser over alleged ties to Qatar: report Foreign lobbyists donated over M during 2020 election: report Former Mueller prosecutor representing Donoghue in congressional probes: report MORE in particular. Manafort’s statements could shed light on whether written responses Trump provided to the special counsel were untruthful, Letter said.

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Trump told Mueller he didn't recall discussing WikiLeaks with Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneLawyer for 17 Jan. 6 defendants says he's been released from hospital Democrats' Jan. 6 subpoena-palooza sets dangerous precedent The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Afghanistan chaos now a deadly crisis as US troops perish MORE, who was convicted of lying to Congress last week. 

But during Stone’s trial, Manafort’s deputy Rick GatesRick GatesTreasury: Manafort associate passed 'sensitive' campaign data to Russian intelligence Trump Jr. was deposed in inauguration funds probe Trump's pardons harshly criticized by legal experts MORE testified that Trump and Stone had a phone conversation following WikiLeaks' publication of emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee. Afterwards, Trump told Gates that more information was coming, Gates testified.

Letter on Monday doubled down on an argument House Democrats made in a September filing in D.C. District Court that redacted grand jury testimony from Manafort and Gates “have direct bearing on whether the president was untruthful” to the special counsel.

The former special counsel’s 448-page report contains redacted passages detailing information gleaned during grand jury proceedings. The House Judiciary Committee is seeking a judicial order to lift the redactions. 

The D.C. Circuit Court last month granted the Justice Department’s request to temporarily block the release of grand jury materials while the case plays out in court.

Updated at 1:44 p.m.