Lori Loughlin says prosecutors are concealing evidence that could clear her in admissions scandal

Lori Loughlin says prosecutors are concealing evidence that could clear her in admissions scandal
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Actress Lori Loughlin and her husband are claiming that federal prosecutors concealed evidence that could potentially exonerate them in the college admissions scandal, according to ABC News.

In a court filing, Loughlin and fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli reportedly requested “urgently needed” help from a Boston federal judge, and asked that the government be compelled to provide evidence that they say proves they did not bribe a University of Southern California (USC) administrator to ensure their daughters were accepted into the school.

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"The Government appears to be concealing exculpatory evidence that helps show that both Defendants believed all of the payments they made would go to USC itself -- for legitimate, university-approved purposes -- or to other legitimate charitable causes,” their attorneys wrote, according to ABC. “The Government’s failure to disclose this information is unacceptable, and this Court should put a stop to it.”

“If, for example, USC knew of Singer’s operation and accepted donations to the university from Singer’s clients as legitimate, then not only was there no bribery at USC, but also no fraud conspiracy at all,” they added, referencing Rick Singer, the consultant accused of masterminding an operation that bribed admissions officers and coaches.

Loughlin and Giannulli have both pleaded not guilty to charges ranging from conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud to money laundering and federal programs bribery. They both face up to 20 years in prison if convicted.

While the two have pleaded not guilty, several other high-profile defendants, including actress Felicity Huffman, have entered guilty pleas. Huffman served 11 days of a 14-day sentence in October.