Ocasio-Cortez rips 'public charge' decision: 'The American Dream isn't a private club with a cover charge'

Ocasio-Cortez rips 'public charge' decision: 'The American Dream isn't a private club with a cover charge'
© Greg Nash

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez defends Sanders running as a Democrat: It's 'more than what you call yourself' House Oversight accuses Border Patrol of blocking investigation into secret Facebook group Company to provide free clothing to any female candidate MORE (D-N.Y.) ripped the Monday Supreme Court decision allowing the Trump administration to move forward with a policy change that could make it harder for immigrants who rely on public assistance to gain legal status.

The high court's move lifts a nationwide injunction on the "public charge" rule change while a challenge plays out in court.

The New York Democrat called the 5-4 decision “shameful” in a tweet. 

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“America shouldn’t have a wealth test for admission,” she posted. “It’s a place where millions of people are descendants of immigrants who came w nothing & made a life.”

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden leads Sanders by single digits in South Carolina: poll Pro-Trump super PAC hits Biden with new Spanish-language ad in Nevada Biden will go after Bloomberg, Sanders at Las Vegas debate, aides say MORE (I-Vt.), a 2020 White House hopeful and like Ocasio-Cortez a democratic socialist, also condemned the ruling, saying the “country was built by immigrants.”

“The American people want comprehensive, humane immigration reform,” he said in a tweet.

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The Supreme Court’s ruling gives the Department of Homeland Security permission to deny entry or legal status to those who will probably require public assistance, which is defined as cash or non-cash benefits such as housing or food, for more than a year in a three-year time period.

Acting Deputy Homeland Security Secretary Ken Cuccinelli praised the decision, saying the Supreme Court is finally “fed up” with judges imposing their policy preferences in court rulings.