Wisconsin Republican would sign on to bill to nullify Trump tariffs

Wisconsin Republican would sign on to bill to nullify Trump tariffs
© Greg Nash

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonEx-Wisconsin governor Scott Walker takes job as president of conservative group, won't seek office soon Democratic Senate hopes hinge on Trump tide GOP senator presses Instagram, Facebook over alleged bias in content recommendations MORE (R-Wis.) said on Sunday that he would support a bill that would nullify President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Camerota clashes with Trump's immigration head over president's tweet LA Times editorial board labels Trump 'Bigot-in-Chief' Trump complains of 'fake polls' after surveys show him trailing multiple Democratic candidates MORE’s recently announced tariffs, but doubts such legislation would pass.

“I would, but I doubt it would have any chance of passing or, even if it passed, that we would have the votes to override the veto,” Johnson told CNN’s “State of the Union” when asked about supporting legislation to nullify the tariffs.

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFlake responds to Trump, Jimmy Carter barbs: 'We need to stop trying to disqualify each other' Jeff Flake responds to Trump's 'greener pastures' dig on former GOP lawmakers Trump says he's 'very happy' some GOP senators have 'gone on to greener pastures' MORE (R-Ariz.) said last week that he will introduce legislation that would revoke Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs.

Johnson on Sunday noted that people in his home state of Wisconsin were becoming more confident in the economy because of Trump's recent moves to reduce regulations.

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We made American businesses more competitive.  We gave real tax cuts to Wisconsinites and Americans,” Johnson said. “There's really growing level of optimism because we're returning certainty to the American and Wisconsin economy.”

The senator said, however, that the tariffs and talk of ending the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) have made people uncertain about their economic future.

“And the talk of canceling NAFTA and now imposing these steel tariffs have just interjected uncertainty into the economy, where it just wasn't necessary,” Johnson said. "So, I'm really concerned that this is counterproductive, as well as you could really result in retaliatory actions by our trade partners.”

Trump announced last Thursday that he would be placing a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and a 10 percent tariff on imported aluminum.

Mexico, Canada and Australia have been exempted from the tariffs and Trump has signaled that exemptions might be available to other nations.