Wisconsin Republican would sign on to bill to nullify Trump tariffs

Wisconsin Republican would sign on to bill to nullify Trump tariffs
© Greg Nash

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonWhite House, GOP defend Trump emergency declaration GOP senator says Republicans didn't control Senate when they held majority GOP senator voices concern about Trump order, hasn't decided whether he'll back it MORE (R-Wis.) said on Sunday that he would support a bill that would nullify President TrumpDonald John TrumpAverage tax refunds down double-digits, IRS data shows White House warns Maduro as Venezuela orders partial closure of border with Colombia Trump administration directs 1,000 more troops to Mexican border MORE’s recently announced tariffs, but doubts such legislation would pass.

“I would, but I doubt it would have any chance of passing or, even if it passed, that we would have the votes to override the veto,” Johnson told CNN’s “State of the Union” when asked about supporting legislation to nullify the tariffs.

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakePoll: 33% of Kentucky voters approve of McConnell Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union MORE (R-Ariz.) said last week that he will introduce legislation that would revoke Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs.

Johnson on Sunday noted that people in his home state of Wisconsin were becoming more confident in the economy because of Trump's recent moves to reduce regulations.

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We made American businesses more competitive.  We gave real tax cuts to Wisconsinites and Americans,” Johnson said. “There's really growing level of optimism because we're returning certainty to the American and Wisconsin economy.”

The senator said, however, that the tariffs and talk of ending the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) have made people uncertain about their economic future.

“And the talk of canceling NAFTA and now imposing these steel tariffs have just interjected uncertainty into the economy, where it just wasn't necessary,” Johnson said. "So, I'm really concerned that this is counterproductive, as well as you could really result in retaliatory actions by our trade partners.”

Trump announced last Thursday that he would be placing a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and a 10 percent tariff on imported aluminum.

Mexico, Canada and Australia have been exempted from the tariffs and Trump has signaled that exemptions might be available to other nations.