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Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule

Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule
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House Democrats are giving Labor Secretary Alexander AcostaAlex Alexander AcostaOn The Money: Trump slams relief bill, calls on Congress to increase stimulus money | Biden faces new critical deadlines after relief package | Labor rule allows restaurants to require broader tip pooling Labor rule allows restaurants to require broader tip pooling Federal litigator files complaint alleging Labor secretary abused his authority MORE until Monday to hand over the agency’s economic analysis for its proposed tip-pooling rule.

In a letter Friday, Democratic Reps. Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottDeLauro wins Steering Committee vote for Appropriations chair National reading, math tests postponed to 2022 amid coronavirus surge Trump officials approve Georgia plan to remove healthcare.gov as enrollment option MORE (Va.), Keith EllisonKeith EllisonMinnesota bar vows to stay open despite lawsuit, ban on indoor dining More than 150 Minnesota businesses vow to defy governor's shutdown order Progressives rally around Turner's House bid MORE (Minn.), Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoHoyer calls on VA Secretary Wilkie to resign after watchdog report Pelosi calls on Wilkie to resign from VA after watchdog report findings Two major veterans' groups demand Wilkie resign after watchdog report findings MORE and Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciLawmakers condemn Trump's 'destabilizing' and 'politicizing' moves on climate assessment OVERNIGHT ENERGY:  House passes sweeping clean energy bill | Pebble Mine CEO resigns over secretly recorded comments about government officials  | Corporations roll out climate goals amid growing pressure to deliver Pelosi, Blumenaur condemn 'egregious abuses of power' by Trump against Oregon protestors MORE (Ore.) asked for any and all economic analyses on the effects of the proposed rule and information on who at the Department of Labor was allegedly involved in hiding the findings.

The letter comes after Bloomberg Law reported this week that senior department officials intentionally withheld a report showing workers could lose billions if the agency changes the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow employers to pool tips. The rule would apply to workers who make at least the federal minimum wage — $7.25 an hour — and share them with non-tipped workers.

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In the letter, the lawmakers asked for a copy of each and every draft, interim, proposed or completed economic analysis prepared or procured by the commission that’s related to the proposed rule.

They also asked for a list of all the meetings held to discuss whether to include or exclude the analysis and the names of Labor Department officials involved in those meetings.

Workers' rights advocates have been arguing since the rule was first proposed that it would allow employers to pocket a portion of the tips workers receive. 

Workers who make less than the federal minimum wage and earn tips to supplement their pay were not part of the proposal.