Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule

Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule
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House Democrats are giving Labor Secretary Alexander AcostaRene (Alex) Alexander AcostaTop aide to Labor secretary to leave amid friction with White House George Conway slams Trump for calling Biden 'creepy': You 'palled around with Jeffrey Epstein' Melania Trump expands mission of 'Be Best' on its one-year anniversary MORE until Monday to hand over the agency’s economic analysis for its proposed tip-pooling rule.

In a letter Friday, Democratic Reps. Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottTop Trump health official warned against controversial ObamaCare changes in private memo Top Trump health official warned against controversial ObamaCare changes in private memo Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage push MORE (Va.), Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonDemocrats face new civil war in primary fight 18 state attorneys general call on Justice Dept to release Mueller report Keith Ellison: Evidence points to Trump being 'sympathetic' to white nationalist point of view MORE (Minn.), Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoSteyer group targeting 12 congressional Democrats over impeachment Steyer group targeting 12 congressional Democrats over impeachment ICE does not know how many veterans it has deported, watchdog says MORE and Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciWHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises WHIP LIST: Number of Democrats backing Trump impeachment inquiry rises DeVos defends controversial guidance on transgender students MORE (Ore.) asked for any and all economic analyses on the effects of the proposed rule and information on who at the Department of Labor was allegedly involved in hiding the findings.

The letter comes after Bloomberg Law reported this week that senior department officials intentionally withheld a report showing workers could lose billions if the agency changes the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow employers to pool tips. The rule would apply to workers who make at least the federal minimum wage — $7.25 an hour — and share them with non-tipped workers.

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In the letter, the lawmakers asked for a copy of each and every draft, interim, proposed or completed economic analysis prepared or procured by the commission that’s related to the proposed rule.

They also asked for a list of all the meetings held to discuss whether to include or exclude the analysis and the names of Labor Department officials involved in those meetings.

Workers' rights advocates have been arguing since the rule was first proposed that it would allow employers to pocket a portion of the tips workers receive. 

Workers who make less than the federal minimum wage and earn tips to supplement their pay were not part of the proposal.