Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule

Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule
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House Democrats are giving Labor Secretary Alexander AcostaRene (Alex) Alexander AcostaSasse calls on DOJ to investigate its handling of wealthy sex offender's plea deal Accusers won't testify for now against wealthy sex offender: report Lawmakers call for investigation into Labor Secretary Acosta for sex offender plea deal MORE until Monday to hand over the agency’s economic analysis for its proposed tip-pooling rule.

In a letter Friday, Democratic Reps. Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottOvernight Health Care: House set to vote on bill targeting drug companies for overcharging Medicaid | Dems press Trump officials on pre-existing conditions | Tobacco giant invests .8B in Canadian marijuana grower A new Congress, time for a new focus on public education Top Dems press Trump officials for answers on pre-existing conditions MORE (Va.), Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonIlhan Omar calls her election to Congress a rejection of ‘religious bigotry’ Minnesota New Members 2019 White candidates are never asked how they win minority-majority districts, says first Muslim congresswoman-elect MORE (Minn.), Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoBipartisan lawmakers call for investigation into VA amid issues with GI Bill benefit payments Dems aim to balance oversight, bipartisanship on VA committee Reporter tops lawmakers to win charity spelling bee MORE and Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciReporter tops lawmakers to win charity spelling bee Lawmakers, media serve up laughs at annual 'Will on the Hill' Congress — when considering women’s health, don’t forget about lung cancer MORE (Ore.) asked for any and all economic analyses on the effects of the proposed rule and information on who at the Department of Labor was allegedly involved in hiding the findings.

The letter comes after Bloomberg Law reported this week that senior department officials intentionally withheld a report showing workers could lose billions if the agency changes the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow employers to pool tips. The rule would apply to workers who make at least the federal minimum wage — $7.25 an hour — and share them with non-tipped workers.

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In the letter, the lawmakers asked for a copy of each and every draft, interim, proposed or completed economic analysis prepared or procured by the commission that’s related to the proposed rule.

They also asked for a list of all the meetings held to discuss whether to include or exclude the analysis and the names of Labor Department officials involved in those meetings.

Workers' rights advocates have been arguing since the rule was first proposed that it would allow employers to pocket a portion of the tips workers receive. 

Workers who make less than the federal minimum wage and earn tips to supplement their pay were not part of the proposal.