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Senate votes to ban microbeads in soap

Senate votes to ban microbeads in soap
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The Senate has approved legislation to ban plastic microbeads from bath products like soaps and body washes. 

The Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015 passed by unanimous consent Wednesday morning, almost two weeks after the bill sailed through the House.

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The legislation, now headed to the president’s desk, aims to protect the nation's lakes and streams from getting clogged with the little pieces of plastic that easily pass through water filtration systems.

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphySaudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP Overnight Defense: Trump worries Saudi Arabia treated as 'guilty until proven innocent' | McConnell opens door to sanctions | Joint Chiefs chair to meet Saudi counterpart | Mattis says Trump backs him '100 percent' Pompeo: Saudis committed to 'accountability' over journalist's disappearance MORE (D-Conn.), who applauded the Senate for passing the bill introduced by Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandAffordable housing set for spotlight of next presidential campaign Overnight Defense — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Senators seek US intel on journalist's disappearance | Army discharged over 500 immigrant recruits in one year | Watchdog knocks admiral over handling of sexual harassment case Pentagon watchdog knocks top admiral for handling of sexual harassment case MORE (D-N.Y.), said an estimated eight trillion tiny plastic microbeads have entered the country’s waterways, threatening aquatic life.

“For much of Connecticut, that means they end up in the Long Island Sound, which is critical to Connecticut’s economy and our way of life," he said in a news release. “As I said before, this is a national problem that Connecticut can’t solve alone.”

Murphy credited state Rep. Terry Backer (D), who died earlier this week, for his part in Wednesday’s victory.

“I cannot help but feel deep regret that Terry Backer, a close friend and mentor, isn’t around to celebrate this victory," he said. "I wouldn’t have fought for this issue so hard without his fierce advocacy in Connecticut, and he deserves credit for the state ban and for raising awareness of this across the country.”

– Jordain Carney contributed to this report