Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power

Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power
© Greg Nash

Republican Senator Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Defense: Officials brief Congress after Iran shoots down drone | Lawmakers fear 'grave situation' | Trump warns Iran | Senate votes to block Saudi arms sales | Bombshell confession at Navy SEAL's murder trial The 7 GOP senators who voted to block all or part of Trump's Saudi arms sale Senate votes to block Trump's Saudi arms sale MORE (Utah) wants to strip the nation’s labor board of its authority to hear labor disputes and issue rules. 

Lee introduced the Protecting American Jobs Act on Thursday to transfer the power of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to hear labor disputes to federal courts.

“For far too long the NLRB has acted as judge, jury, and executioner, for labor disputes in this country,” Lee said in a statement.

“The havoc they have wrought by upsetting decades of established labor law has cost countless jobs. This common-sense legislation would finally restore fairness and accountability to our nation’s labor laws."

The bill, co-sponsored by Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz Hickenlooper, Bennet bring deep ties to 2020 debate stage 2020 Democrat Bennet releases comprehensive government reform plan GOP frets about Trump's poll numbers MORE (R-Texas), James Lankford (R-Okla.), Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonUS officials express optimism negotiations with Iran possible Cotton: 'Healthy skepticism warranted' when dealing with Democrats on immigration Cotton: I hope Trump's statement 'got through' to Iran's leaders MORE (R-Ark.), Luther Strange (R-Ala.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Trump issues order to bring transparency to health care prices | Fight over billions in ObamaCare payments heads to Supreme Court Ex-Obama counterterrorism official: Huawei could pose security threat to international intelligence community The Memo: All eyes on faltering Biden ahead of first debate MORE (R-Fla.), also strips the board of its rulemaking power.

“Such rulemaking authority shall be limited to rules concerning the internal function of the board,” the bill says.

“The board shall not promulgate rules or regulations that affect the substantive or procedural rights of any person, employer, employee, or labor organization, including rules and regulations concerning unfair labor practice and representation elections.”

NLRB — responsible for enforcing workers’ collective bargaining rights and fair labor practices — issued a controversial rule and several contentious rulings during the Obama administration.

In 2014, it issued a rule to speed up union elections and a year later issued a ruling in a labor dispute that changed the definition of a joint-employer. Business groups have fought the change ever since, claiming it unfairly makes business owners jointly liable for labor law violations committed by their subcontractors and franchisors responsible for their franchisees.