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Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power

Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power
© Greg Nash

Republican Senator Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Energy: Colonial Pipeline says it has restored full service | Biden urges people not to panic about gasoline shortages | EPA rescinds Trump-era cost-benefit rule Senate panel advances Biden's deputy Interior pick Hillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech MORE (Utah) wants to strip the nation’s labor board of its authority to hear labor disputes and issue rules. 

Lee introduced the Protecting American Jobs Act on Thursday to transfer the power of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to hear labor disputes to federal courts.

“For far too long the NLRB has acted as judge, jury, and executioner, for labor disputes in this country,” Lee said in a statement.

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“The havoc they have wrought by upsetting decades of established labor law has cost countless jobs. This common-sense legislation would finally restore fairness and accountability to our nation’s labor laws."

The bill, co-sponsored by Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzBipartisanship has become a partisan weapon Former OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden Seth Rogen says he's not in a feud with 'fascist' Ted Cruz, whose 'words caused people to die' MORE (R-Texas), James Lankford (R-Okla.), Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonTim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Opposition to refugees echoes one of America's most shameful moments White House defends CDC outreach to teachers union MORE (R-Ark.), Luther Strange (R-Ala.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe imminent crises facing Joe Biden Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signs daylight savings bill Study: Early unemployment cutoff would cost 16M people 0B MORE (R-Fla.), also strips the board of its rulemaking power.

“Such rulemaking authority shall be limited to rules concerning the internal function of the board,” the bill says.

“The board shall not promulgate rules or regulations that affect the substantive or procedural rights of any person, employer, employee, or labor organization, including rules and regulations concerning unfair labor practice and representation elections.”

NLRB — responsible for enforcing workers’ collective bargaining rights and fair labor practices — issued a controversial rule and several contentious rulings during the Obama administration.

In 2014, it issued a rule to speed up union elections and a year later issued a ruling in a labor dispute that changed the definition of a joint-employer. Business groups have fought the change ever since, claiming it unfairly makes business owners jointly liable for labor law violations committed by their subcontractors and franchisors responsible for their franchisees.