Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power

Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power
© Greg Nash

Republican Senator Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeHillicon Valley: Google delays cutting off Huawei | GOP senators split over breaking up big tech | Report finds DNC lagging behind RNC on cybersecurity GOP senators split over antitrust remedies for big tech Fix the climate with smaller families MORE (Utah) wants to strip the nation’s labor board of its authority to hear labor disputes and issue rules. 

Lee introduced the Protecting American Jobs Act on Thursday to transfer the power of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to hear labor disputes to federal courts.

“For far too long the NLRB has acted as judge, jury, and executioner, for labor disputes in this country,” Lee said in a statement.

“The havoc they have wrought by upsetting decades of established labor law has cost countless jobs. This common-sense legislation would finally restore fairness and accountability to our nation’s labor laws."

The bill, co-sponsored by Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzJim Carrey fires back at 'Joe McCarthy wanna-be' Cruz Hillicon Valley: Google delays cutting off Huawei | GOP senators split over breaking up big tech | Report finds DNC lagging behind RNC on cybersecurity GOP senators split over antitrust remedies for big tech MORE (R-Texas), James Lankford (R-Okla.), Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonGOP senator: Supreme Court abortion cases were 'wrongly decided as a constitutional matter' Senate confirms controversial 9th Circuit pick without blue slips Cotton: US could win war with Iran in 'two strikes' MORE (R-Ark.), Luther Strange (R-Ala.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioAnother VPOTUS tries for POTUS: What does history tell us? Tensions swirl around Iran as administration to brief Congress Tensions swirl around Iran as administration to brief Congress MORE (R-Fla.), also strips the board of its rulemaking power.

“Such rulemaking authority shall be limited to rules concerning the internal function of the board,” the bill says.

“The board shall not promulgate rules or regulations that affect the substantive or procedural rights of any person, employer, employee, or labor organization, including rules and regulations concerning unfair labor practice and representation elections.”

NLRB — responsible for enforcing workers’ collective bargaining rights and fair labor practices — issued a controversial rule and several contentious rulings during the Obama administration.

In 2014, it issued a rule to speed up union elections and a year later issued a ruling in a labor dispute that changed the definition of a joint-employer. Business groups have fought the change ever since, claiming it unfairly makes business owners jointly liable for labor law violations committed by their subcontractors and franchisors responsible for their franchisees.