Overnight Regulation: Bees and beer

Welcome to Overnight Regulation, your daily rundown of news from Capitol Hill and beyond. It's Tuesday evening here in Washington, where it's starting to get cold outside and the summer is a distant memory.

Here's the latest.

 

THE BIG STORY

Regulators will allow a key ingredient in beer to be used to protect honeybees from extinction.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Tuesday approved the widespread use of a pesticide known as potassium salts of hops beta acids (HBAs) around honeycombs.

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The EPA is lifting previous restrictions on the use of these hops as a pesticide.

These hops will be used to target certain parasites that attack honeybees.

They are "generally recognized as safe" for human consumption, according to the EPA, because they are commonly used to flavor beer and preserve meat.

"There is a long history of safe use of HBAs via the oral and dietary exposure to humans from its use as a preservative on meats and its presence in the beer brewing process," the EPA wrote.

The rule goes into effect immediately.

 

ON TAP FOR WEDNESDAY

The Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee will hold a hearing to discuss regulating agriculture biotechnologies. http://1.usa.gov/1LBEV4k

The Senate Environment and Public Works' Subcommittee on Superfund, Waste, Management and Regulatory Oversight will hold a hearing to examine regulatory impact analyses for Environmental Protection Agency regulations. http://1.usa.gov/1W3tNYb

The House Financial Services' Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit will hold a hearing to examine legislative proposals to reduce regulatory burdens on job creators. http://1.usa.gov/1hQZbWS

The House Education and the Workforce's Subcommittee on Workforce Protections will hold a hearing to review mine safety policies to better protect American workers. http://1.usa.gov/1NMtWdS

The House Energy and Commerce's Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade will hold a hearing to examine ways to improve vehicle and roadway safety. http://1.usa.gov/1ZIKFTm

TOMORROW'S REGS TODAY

The Obama administration will publish 215 new regulations, proposed rules, notices and other administrative actions in Wednesday's edition of the Federal Register.

--The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) will propose new fair housing regulations.

The fair housing regulations will establish standards for investigating claims of harassment on the basis of race, national origin, sex, religion, family status, or disability.

The public has 60 days to comment. http://bit.ly/1LBQWqd

--The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will issue provisional guidelines for handling spent fuel storage.

The draft interim staff guidance will help staff "determine whether spent fuel storage systems are designed to allow ready retrieval of spent fuel."

The public has 30 days to comment. http://bit.ly/1GgQUrb

--The Department of Defense (DOD) will delay further implementation of a rule to help defense contractors avoid counterfeit electronic parts.

The Defense Department proposed the requirements in September, but is extending the comment period until Dec. 11 to give the public more time to consider the changes. http://bit.ly/1MCmR9T

--The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) will exempt dozens of partially blind truck drivers from rules that would otherwise prohibit them from driving.

Many of these truck drivers have lost vision in one eye, but can still see with their other eye. The FMCSA announced Tuesday it is renewing the exemptions for 64 truck drivers. http://bit.ly/1NSOEc5

Meanwhile, the FMCSA is also considering exempting 44 truck drivers with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus from rules that would otherwise prohibit them from operating trucks. http://bit.ly/1hRiOOC

The public has 30 days to comment.

 

NEWS RIGHT NOW 

USDA: Farm to school programs help schools serve healthier meals http://bit.ly/1Rmk0FJ

Unions mobilize against hair testing for truck drivers http://bit.ly/1PxQHCT

Dems to feds: Stop sending funding to fraudulent schools http://bit.ly/1LmnZ3G

Labor pushing new protections for scrap recycling workers http://bit.ly/1PEB23z

IRS enhances efforts to combat identity fraud - The Washington Post http://wapo.st/1PEHDLl

More federal employees are getting help from Uncle Sam to pay off college debt - The Washington Post http://wapo.st/1W2SbUg

Subway to cease use of antibiotics in entire meat supple by 2025 - USA Today http://usat.ly/1Go18pi

 

BY THE NUMBERS

42,000: The number of schools that participate in farm-to-school programs across the country.

$600M: The money schools spend each year buying locally-sourced food.

(Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture).

 

QUOTE OF THE DAY

"Allowing fraudulent for-profit schools to continue collecting federal funding until they collapse is unacceptable," Senate Democrats Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinThreat of impeachment takes oxygen out of 2019 agenda Senate Democrats request watchdog, Red Cross probe DHS detention facilities Iraq War looms over Trump battle with Iran MORE (Ill.), Richard Blumenthal (Conn.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign 2020 Dems put spotlight on disabilities issues MORE (Mass.) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownOn The Money: Judge upholds House subpoena for Trump financial records | Trump vows to appeal ruling by 'Obama-appointed judge' | Canada, Mexico lift retaliatory tariffs on US | IRS audit rate falls Lawmakers grapple with the future of America's workforce The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate MORE (Ohio) said in a letter to the Education Department. 

We’ll work to stay on top of these and other stories throughout the week, so check The Hill’s Regulation page (http://thehill.com/regulation) early and often for the latest. And send any comments, complaints or regulatory news tips our way, tdevaney@thehill.com or lwheeler@thehill.com. And follow us at @timdevaney and@wheelerlydia.

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