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Dem senators 'troubled' by GMO labeling system

Dem senators 'troubled' by GMO labeling system

Senate Democrats are casting doubt on the feasibility of a new initiative from the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) aimed at labeling foods with genetically modified ingredients.

In a letter to the GMA Thursday, Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyFive centrist Democrats oppose Pelosi for Speaker in tight vote David Sirota: Democrats gave away leverage in forcing vote on ,000 checks Sanders to slow down NDAA veto override in bid to get vote on K checks proposal MORE (D-Mass.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyPompeo's flurry of foreign policy moves hampers Biden start Senior Democrat says Hawley, Cruz should step down from Judiciary Congress unveils .3 trillion government spending and virus relief package MORE (D-Vt.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden tax-hike proposals face bumpy road ahead Senate Democrats leery of nixing filibuster 'Almost Heaven, West Virginia' — Joe Manchin and a 50-50 Senate MORE (I-Vt.), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterSenate Democrats leery of nixing filibuster 50-50 Senate opens the door to solutions outlasting Trump's moment of violence Biden VA pick faces 'steep learning curve' at massive agency MORE (D-Mt.) and Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphySenate Democrats leery of nixing filibuster Democratic senator: COVID-19 relief is priority over impeachment trial Lawmakers push back on late Trump terror designation for Yemen's Houthis MORE (D-Conn.) said the group’s voluntary SmartLabel program discriminates against a large segment of the population by relying on smartphone technology to give consumers the information they’re seeking online.

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Because consumers would have to use their smartphones to scan a barcode or QR code on products while shopping, the senators want to know how GMA will ensure that consumers who don't have smartphones — typically elderly, low-income or less-educated individuals — would be able to obtain the information. 

“While we recognize that the companies committed to this initiative are taking a step towards supplying consumers with the information that they deserve to have access to, we are troubled that this initiative may have significant anti-consumer loopholes,” the senators said.

“We worry that this initiative will instead make it more difficult for consumers to learn basic information about the food products they are buying, such as whether a product contains a specific allergen or whether the product uses genetically engineered ingredients.”

The lawmakers also expressed concerns about technical hurdles with various smartphone models on the market and consumer privacy, citing a recent poll from the Mellman Group, which found that 82 percent of consumers think food manufacturers should be restricted from collecting personal information, such as food choices and physical location.

They asked what promises manufactures participating in the SmartLabel initiative will make to assure consumers that their personal information will not be used or sold and how they plan to address technological challenges such as access to adequate cell phone data service in grocery stores.

GMA was asked to answer the lawmakers' questions by Feb. 17.