FEATURED:

GOP warming up to Cuba travel

GOP warming up to Cuba travel

Republican opposition to lifting the Cuban travel embargo is beginning to erode on Capitol Hill.

As President Obama looks to restore diplomatic relations with the country, a small but growing number of Republicans are getting behind a measure from Sens. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeOn The Money: Treasury official charged with leaking info on ex-Trump advisers | Trump to seek 5 percent budget cut from Cabinet members | Mnuchin to decide by Thursday on attending Saudi conference Mnuchin to decide by Thursday whether to attend Saudi conference GOP senator: Not 'appropriate' for Mnuchin to go to Saudi conference MORE's (Ariz.) and Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranSenate Republicans demand Google hand over memo advising it to hide data vulnerability Overnight Defense — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Missing journalist strains US-Saudi ties | Senators push Trump to open investigation | Trump speaks with Saudi officials | New questions over support for Saudi coalition in Yemen Senators demand answers on Trump administration backing of Saudi coalition in Yemen MORE (Kan.) that would lift the restrictions on American tourism in Cuba.

ADVERTISEMENT

The bipartisan Freedom to Travel to Cuba Act from Flake has 51 co-sponsors so far, and gained an additional 14 Republican supporters this year alone in the House and Senate. 

Bolstering Flake’s effort, presumptive Republican nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump renews attacks against Tester over VA nominee on eve of Montana rally Trump submits 2017 federal income tax returns Corker: Trump administration 'clamped down' on Saudi intel, canceled briefing MORE has also expressed support for opening up Cuba, saying that he is “fine” with Obama’s attempt to normalize relations.

But there is still strong opposition among congressional Republicans to lifting the travel ban. Prominent lawmakers such as Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzProtesters confront Cruz at airport over Kavanaugh vote O'Rourke targets Cruz with several attack ads a day after debate Election Countdown: O'Rourke goes on the attack | Takeaways from fiery second Texas Senate debate | Heitkamp apologizes for ad misidentifying abuse victims | Trump Jr. to rally for Manchin challenger | Rick Scott leaves trail to deal with hurricane damage MORE (R-Texas) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP leaders hesitant to challenge Trump on Saudi Arabia On The Money: Treasury official charged with leaking info on ex-Trump advisers | Trump to seek 5 percent budget cut from Cabinet members | Mnuchin to decide by Thursday on attending Saudi conference Mnuchin to decide by Thursday whether to attend Saudi conference MORE (R-Fla.) remain staunchly opposed, arguing it would enrich the Castro government despite its history of human rights abuses.

“We all want more democracy in Cuba,” Flake told The Hill. “They see it a little differently than I do, but they know this is the direction it’s going.”

The Obama administration has loosened some of the Cuba travel restrictions to allow politicians, journalists, students, and Cuban-Americans who are meeting family to visit to the communist island. But only Congress can lift the restrictions entirely.

The same is true of the Cuban trade embargo, which prevents the majority of American businesses from operating on the island.

It’s an issue that has divided lawmakers on both sides of the aisle for more than five decades.

“I’ve had this argument with [Flake] for years,” said Rep. Chris Smith (R-N.J.). “Our currency is keeping this dictatorship afloat. The Cuban travel industry is largely run by the Castro regime, so our money is flowing into their coffers and keeping the dictatorship afloat.”

But critics of the embargo say keeping it only place only worsens the human rights abuses that critics invoke.

“The more tourists you have with cameras, at some point it begins to put pressure on the Cuban government to treat their people more appropriately,” Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) told The Hill.  

"Are the security forces more or less likely to beat up a lady in white if there are a bunch of tourists holding video cameras?”

Cassidy signed on as a co-sponsor of Flake’s bill last month.

Flake told The Hill momentum is building among Republicans who want to lift the Cuba travel restrictions.

“Believe me, we’ve got more than 60 votes,” Flake told The Hill, adding that he's spoken with Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoLawmakers, Wall Street shrug off Trump's escalating Fed attacks GOP loads up lame-duck agenda as House control teeters Republicans shift course after outside counsel falters MORE (R-Idaho) and Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonGillum holds razor-thin lead in Florida race Senate panel wants Hyundai, Kia to answer over reported engine fires Election Countdown: Dems outraise GOP in final stretch | 2018 midterms already most expensive in history | What to watch in second Cruz-O'Rourke debate | Trump raises 0M for reelection | Why Dems fear Avenatti's approach MORE (D-Fla.), and believes they will sign onto the measure in the near future.

A House measure similar to Flake’s led by Rep. Mark Sanford (R-S.C.) has 130 co-sponsors, including nearly two-dozen Republicans.

But there are staunch opponents of lifting the travel ban in the House Republican Conference.

Among them is Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), one of the most vocal critics of President Obama's efforts to normalize relations with Cuba.

"Cuban people are no more free today than they were before Obama's terrible deal" Ros-Lehtinen said in 2014.

“Lifting the tourism ban would infuse the Castro dictatorship with billions of dollars, which it would use to more aggressively oppose U.S. interests in our hemisphere and to further repress the Cuban people,” Rep. Carlos Curbelo (R-Fla.) told McClatchy when the bill was introduced.