‘Queer Eye’ star says TSA is profiling him

A host of Netflix’s popular reboot of “Queer Eye” on Wednesday accused the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) of profiling him at airports.

Tan France posted on Twitter that he had been put through extra security checks three times this week.

He wrote that a TSA agent told him it was because his name was on a list.

“WTF? I’m brown but that does NOT mean I’m a damn security risk!!!” France added.

France is an openly gay English fashion designer of Pakistani descent.

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He elaborated on the incident in a video on Instagram once he made it onto the airplane, saying he was "f------ fuming" after his two-hour ordeal at the TSA check-in. 

France said that he normally goes through security quickly because he has TSA Precheck, a membership program that offers expedited security screenings. 

He said on Instagram that a TSA Precheck official told him his name was added to a "list of concern." 

"So here's how this goes down, and this has gone down three times this week," France said. "What happens is when you're checking in, they tell you you can't use your Precheck because there's a security issue." 

He said he is then directed to the normal security line. 

"At that point they take you out of line and then they search you and they give you pat down — which is humiliating, where they check everything — and then they go through all your bags and take a good 45 minutes to go through your bag." 

Once he was released by TSA security officials and allowed to proceed to the gate, he was not allowed to board the plane immediately because TSA had put unrecognizable stamps on his boarding pass. 

"So the reason I wanted to post this so I could tag TSA and hopefully they see this at some point and figure out why the f--- they're treating me like this," France said.

"Because I know the answer. I know why I'm being profiled," he added. 

TSA said in a statement to The Hill that all airline passengers, "regardless of race, gender, or religion," are screened at airport checkpoints. 

"TSA cannot comment on the security designation for specific individuals, and there are a number of reasons a passenger can be selected for additional screening, including by random designation," the statement read. 

The agency also responded to France on Twitter, directing him to the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) resolution page for travelers who believe they were unfairly or incorrectly screened by TSA. 

“We’re sorry to hear this,” AskTSA wrote on social media.

DHS’s Traveler Redress Inquiry Program allows travelers who are denied or delayed airline boarding, entry or exit into the U.S. at a port of entry to border crossing or have been repeatedly referred to additional screenings to file an inquiry.